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  #1  
Old 06-29-2009, 11:04 PM
Jason Dunn
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Default Acer Aspire One for $199 from Expansys

<div class='os_post_top_link'><a href='http://www.expansys-usa.com/d.aspx?i=184342&partner=pthoughts' target='_blank'>http://www.expansys-usa.com/d.aspx?...rtner=pthoughts</a><br /><br /></div><p>This is a bit off topic for some sites in our network, but a good deal is a good deal: our hardware affiliate partner Expansys is selling the Linux-based version of the <a href="http://www.expansys-usa.com/d.aspx?i=184342&amp;partner=pthoughts" target="_blank">Acer Aspire One for $199</a>, which is an excellent deal. This version of the Aspire One has an 8.9 inch screen, 1 GB of RAM, a 120 GB hard drive, and uses the 1.6 Ghz Intel Atom CPU. Combine that netbook with a <a href="http://www.digitalhomethoughts.com/news/show/94262/pre-order-windows-7-home-premium-upgrade-for-49-99-limited-time-offer.html" target="_blank">$49 copy of Windows 7</a>, and you've got yourself a nice little piece of mobile computing technology (just be sure to also have an external USB-based optical drive). I haven't installed Windows 7 on an Acer Aspire One, but I suspect it would work just fine - Windows 7 identified all the important hardware on my MSI Wind and HP Mini 1000 netbooks without a problem.&nbsp;At the time of this writing, Expansys only has 58 left in stock, so don't delay.</p>
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  #2  
Old 06-29-2009, 11:41 PM
Dyvim
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How would you apply the $49 Windows 7 Home Premium Upgrade to a Linux netbook? Don't you need to buy the full version not the upgrade?
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Old 06-30-2009, 02:40 AM
EscapePod
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I picked mine up at CompUSA last week (specs seem the same, different last 4 digits in model number). Its said to be a refurb, but I cannot find any indication it was ever used.

It came with Windows XP Home edition. That qualifies for the Win 7 upgrade price ($49), however, it requires install from scratch --- not a problem for me, and I look forward to it.

I also have a sweet, ultra compact, external DVD drive for it.
 
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  #4  
Old 06-30-2009, 03:44 AM
Jason Dunn
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dyvim View Post
How would you apply the $49 Windows 7 Home Premium Upgrade to a Linux netbook? Don't you need to buy the full version not the upgrade?
I don't know if they've changed this with Windows 7, but with Vista you could install a trial version of Vista then plaster the upgrade over that. There are lots of ways around needing a full version - I don't think I've ever bought a full version of Windows in 10+ years...
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Old 06-30-2009, 04:16 AM
mtd19
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jason Dunn View Post
I don't know if they've changed this with Windows 7, but with Vista you could install a trial version of Vista then plaster the upgrade over that. There are lots of ways around needing a full version - I don't think I've ever bought a full version of Windows in 10+ years...
Or you could, you know, just use linux for free...

I mean what's the use of windows on such an underpowered system? It's lightweight so give it a lightweight operating system.

The only reason to use Windows is if you need some software that is Windows only (Photoshop, most games, etc.) and most of that either has free alternatives or would be really slow on this.

But hey, do as you wish, just offering some advice.
 
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  #6  
Old 06-30-2009, 06:04 PM
Jason Dunn
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Originally Posted by mtd19 View Post
Or you could, you know, just use linux for free...
Linux might be fine for some people, but I've yet to see any flavour of it that doesn't suck for my needs. It's fine on the surface, but once you get past the nice start screen, you're into Linux land where, if you don't know much of anything about Linux (that's me!), nothing makes any sense.

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I mean what's the use of windows on such an underpowered system? It's lightweight so give it a lightweight operating system.
You've obviously missed all the articles about how well Windows 7 works on netbooks. Honestly, it's quite good. Windows is running on upwards of 98% of all netbooks. Some brands of Linux-based netbooks have 4 to 1 return rates vs. their matching Linux counterparts. The market has spoken, and the market says they want Windows on their netbooks.

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The only reason to use Windows is if you need some software that is Windows only (Photoshop, most games, etc.) and most of that either has free alternatives or would be really slow on this.
So you don't think that user interface matters at all? I think having an operating system that you're familiar with matters quite a bit - to me at least.
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Old 06-30-2009, 08:34 PM
doogald
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jason Dunn View Post
I don't know if they've changed this with Windows 7, but with Vista you could install a trial version of Vista then plaster the upgrade over that.
It works, but it is hardly legal. (If being legal is important to you.)
 
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  #8  
Old 06-30-2009, 10:21 PM
Jason Dunn
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Originally Posted by doogald View Post
It works, but it is hardly legal. (If being legal is important to you.)
Most people have a license for Windows kicking around - and it's far faster to install the trial of Vista then upgrade it to the full version than it is to install XP. That's the only reason I suggested it - I'm not advocating anyone breaking licensing rules.
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  #9  
Old 07-01-2009, 05:43 AM
mtd19
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jason Dunn View Post
Linux might be fine for some people, but I've yet to see any flavour of it that doesn't suck for my needs. It's fine on the surface, but once you get past the nice start screen, you're into Linux land where, if you don't know much of anything about Linux (that's me!), nothing makes any sense.
The usual learning curve, but I've found Ubuntu to be very intuitive and easy to transition to

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jason Dunn View Post
You've obviously missed all the articles about how well Windows 7 works on netbooks. Honestly, it's quite good. Windows is running on upwards of 98% of all netbooks. Some brands of Linux-based netbooks have 4 to 1 return rates vs. their matching Linux counterparts. The market has spoken, and the market says they want Windows on their netbooks.
Okay, if you say so. However, I'm sure that most commercial software that is Windows only (with no open source alternative) is too powerful for a netbook even if Windows performs well. Games for example. I feel like any software you would use on such a portable PC could be available on Linux.

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So you don't think that user interface matters at all? I think having an operating system that you're familiar with matters quite a bit - to me at least.
Oh sure it does, and Linux is designed much better than windows. Windows command line is a PITA and Linux is much easier to use (heck I'm even comfortable on the Mac terminal because it's unix). Also, Linux is way easier to manage installs - no windows registry and everything is centralized for easy install and removal. I mean Windows has add/remove programs but let's face it, it's kind of a mess. The biggest advantage to Linux in this area is all software can be upgraded automatically. In Windows you have to run each program's updater or look yourself. This is all based on my experience with Ubuntu, but many other distros are similar. And overall, I really like the UI of Linux. But hey, I'm a CS guy, so I'm in the minority.

Not saying you're wrong, but I think it's a waste of money personally.
 
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  #10  
Old 07-01-2009, 05:25 PM
Jason Dunn
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mtd19 View Post
Okay, if you say so. However, I'm sure that most commercial software that is Windows only (with no open source alternative) is too powerful for a netbook even if Windows performs well. Games for example.
Well, the most common thing I get asked about, by far, is whether or not Microsoft Office will run on a netbook. People want to use Word, and Word/Excel/PowerPoint all run just fine. OpenOffice also runs fine, but it doesn't seem to me to be any faster than Office so it's not like there's a speed advantage to open source software in that way. I haven't benchmarked OpenOffice on Linux vs. Word on Windows, but on my HP Mini 1000 Mobile Internet Edition (Linux) OpenOffice seems pretty sluggish. In fact, everything seems pretty sluggish.

People have also asked me about crazy things like running AutoCAD software on a netbook - technically it will all work (barring any hard-coded software limits), even though it would be painfully slow. People are really keen to push the limits of what a netbook can do, and it's always about their favourite software - their favourite Windows software. The average person doesn't seem to care much about the operating system - they care about the software running on it.

Quote:
Originally Posted by mtd19 View Post
Windows command line is a PITA and Linux is much easier to use (heck I'm even comfortable on the Mac terminal because it's unix).
Command line? That right there tells me we're speaking two different languages - 99.99% of people buying netbooks wouldn't know what the command line was if they were staring at it. I've never dropped to the command line on my Windows 7 netbook, and I rarely do it on my Vista desktop computers - and if I do, it's to do a ping or tracert, hardly anything fancy.

Anyway, I'm glad that Linux on a netbook works well for you - but I trust you realize that your needs are not typical for most consumers.
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