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  #21  
Old 04-30-2010, 08:11 PM
Perry Reed
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Janak Parekh View Post
Actually, I was not referring to the programming model; I'm fully aware of that. What I was referring to was the fact it syncs against the web, not with desktops, not with flash devices. Palm designed the webOS platform to work in the cloud. Now while it is possible HP can link it to their printers and cameras and Bluetooth solutions, it seems kind of peripheral to me. I accept the argument of "integrated strategy" as mobile hardware coupled with mobile software, and I think HP can do a good job with that. DLNA and whatnot to tie content in, yes, I suppose I could see that. But tying into their desktop/enterprise solutions... not so much in the current iteration. That said, it's certainly not impossible, but they've got quite the work cut out for them.

--janak
Personally, I think desktop syncing has gone (and deserves to go) the way of the dinosaurs! If I never ever plug my phone into my PC to sync it again, I'll be very happy. That the Palm syncs to the cloud is a very good thing, in my view. My PC also syncs to the cloud (ALL of my PCs do that), so my data is sync'd quite nicely!

In fact, many of HPs enterprise tools are also web-based (I use many of the former Mercury tools daily), so HP seems well poised to make a play there, too.
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  #22  
Old 04-30-2010, 08:11 PM
Janak Parekh
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ptyork View Post
I guess I think Palm's "any cloud" strategy is a major benefit here. Certainly over Apple's "Mobile Me or the highway" strategy.
... except iPhone has good, and steadily improving, EAS support as well as other enterprise requirements (with OS 4 adding yet more).

Quote:
They know they've got some work to do. Thus the whole "doubling down" sound bite that everyone's throwing about. But I don't think it is as challenging as you think. The hard part is getting a good mobile OS core created and that's done. Adding butter to your bread (yeah, I'm just throwing in a wholly disconnected Metaphor)--especially if they don't have to craft a knife (i.e., the existing bevy of Palm developers--oy with the metaphor)--isn't nearly as difficult.
As long as HP's past mobile culture doesn't permeate, yes, you're right. Consider me skeptical, having seen them drive two mobile lines into the ground. Yes, I know it was Microsoft's OS, but I for one don't see this happening in the right way. I hope I'm wrong.

--janak
 
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  #23  
Old 04-30-2010, 08:15 PM
Perry Reed
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Originally Posted by ptyork View Post
I agree, in the short term at least. But WP7 is NOT an enterprise solution. It is further away even than webOS. I think that this will be one of the first thing HP addresses. What is really required? Encryption of the file system (easy since there's very little in the way of a true file system). Remote provisioning and wipe (an effort, but not major). Lockdown/removal of camera--easily accomplished. EAS support (it's in there). Control over app installation and custom app distribution (again, pretty much in there). I'm sure there are some things I'm missing. And of course there's all kinds of testing and certification needed if they want to get into the government.

But I don't think we're talking years. Maybe 6-12 months for a good enterprise solution and maybe an additional year to get into the government.

Personally, I think this is one of the main reasons that HP bought webOS--so that they could adapt webOS for distribution to their corporate / government customers.

MY worry actually is that they'll focus too much on these features and neglect some of the more consumer-focused R&D.
I hope you're right about the 6-12 months and I think you've covered most of what they'd need to do to make webOS entrprise-ready. There are a few other minor things, like improvements to the calendar and task handling, but those could be easily done.

I do agree that we're likely to see webOS in many more markets and configurations and on more devices than we've seen, thanks to this deal.
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  #24  
Old 04-30-2010, 08:32 PM
Don Tolson
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ptyork View Post
I agree, in the short term at least. But WP7 is NOT an enterprise solution. It is further away even than webOS.
I think you may be short-changing WP7 a bit here. A lot of what you mention as EAS support to be developed in WebOS is already in WP7. There have been a lot more demonstrations of WP7's capabilities and discussions with MS people over the last couple of weeks making it look a lot more ready than it did before. I think MS is also aware that the next devices MUST address corporate employees as being people, too and providing a device which meets both their corporate and personal needs and can keep the two separate.

To quote Gizmodo..."http://gizmodo.com/5526620/why-hp-bu...yline=true&s=i"Why, though, not just stick with Windows Phone 7, or Android? Palm's webOS might be a robust platform, but it's lacking a robust developer community—its 2,000 apps pale in comparison to what the Apple App Store and Android Market offer. The answer is that HP's hedging: they'll continue to work with other platforms, while hoping that their scale will help ramp-up dev interest in broadening the webOS ecosystem.
Worst Case Scenario

The real challenge might come in reconciling the brand personalities. Palm's products, regardless of how well they've sold, have always been innovative—the Pre was a breath of fresh air when it was released. HP, on the other hand, has tended to paint in broad beige strokes. And their products that do stand out, like the Envy laptop, have come across as derivative. There's also the unfortunate case of iPaq—another HP acquisition that was left to rot."
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  #25  
Old 04-30-2010, 08:36 PM
ptyork
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Actually, they're far closer with the Enterprise-ready part than I'd thought initially.

http://www.palm.com/us/assets/pdfs/b...r_Security.pdf

Janak, yes, the iPhone offers EAS as a potential second "cloud" for some stuff. But it is nowhere near as well integrated into the core apps as it could be (maybe 4.0 is better). Plus, it sucks. I had to basically turn it off and switch back to IMAP for email because it was so unreliable. Admittedly, this could be Gmail's EAS and not Apple's fault...

You do know that webOS offers first class EAS support, too, right? From day 1 (or at least day 2). Mail, Contacts, Calendar AND Tasks as well as GAL support. How Apple decided not to include tasks on the iPhone, I will never understand. I assume Steve just decided he didn't use task management tools so nobody else should either. And the lack of a week view...the most widely used calendar view?!? But I digress.
 
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  #26  
Old 05-02-2010, 11:05 PM
Kevin Daly
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What will happen now needs to be looked at in the light of what *would* and *wouldn't* have happened if this acquisition hadn't taken place.

Does anyone see any likelihood of HP with their Enterprise fixation having produced a compelling Windows Phone 7 device and marketing it effectively?
I don't think HP were ever going to be an effective player in the WP7 space, so their loss as a partner shouldn't spook anyone.

The new unGodly HP-Palm hybrid may or may not produce some interesting hardware, but for the next year or so at least the competition is going to be iPhone and Android.

PS. I say this as the proud owner of a Jornada 545.
So much potential, so few clues.
 
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  #27  
Old 05-24-2010, 03:07 AM
epdm2be
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Janak Parekh View Post
I hate to be a skeptic, but I personally think HP will drive this into the ground even faster, as they did to their Jornada and Compaq's iPaq (née iPAQ) lines.

--janak
funny how some of us think alike ;-)
 
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