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  #11  
Old 01-05-2011, 07:09 AM
Fritzly
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[QUOTE=Sven;731610]The 'approval' is an opportunity to ensure it doesn't break anything. QUOTE]

I always loved this "fairy tale" used by carriers, here in the US, to justify the delay of total lack of updates; in the rest of the World where the majority of phones are sold SIM free carriers have no say about updates....... and still networks work.......
 
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  #12  
Old 01-06-2011, 01:42 AM
Sven Johannsen
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lee Yuan Sheng View Post
I'd love to see the reasoning behind dropping Tasks (yes, I'm not going to let go of this :P).
I'm sure you wouldn't agree with the reasoning, even if you knew it. My guess is they did a survey and found fewer than (pick a small percentage) of users used tasks.
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  #13  
Old 01-06-2011, 03:01 AM
Fritzly
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sven View Post
I'm sure you wouldn't agree with the reasoning, even if you knew it. My guess is they did a survey and found fewer than (pick a small percentage) of users used tasks.
I wonder who MS supposedly surveyed, surely not the same people that the Office team surveyed......

Obviously a 14 years old kid would not find Tasks useful but the vast majority of people who spent $400 to buy Office are missing tasks and many other functionalities that, again, were available in WM 2002.
 
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  #14  
Old 01-06-2011, 03:02 AM
whydidnt
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sven View Post
I'm sure you wouldn't agree with the reasoning, even if you knew it. My guess is they did a survey and found fewer than (pick a small percentage) of users used tasks.
I wouldn't doubt that to be true. But it is strange when you consider how many "tasks" type apps are for sale for both the iPhone and Android. Somebody must want to keep track of tasks, when these apps are so prevalent, right?
 
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  #15  
Old 01-07-2011, 03:34 PM
Janak Parekh
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Quote:
Originally Posted by whydidnt View Post
I wouldn't doubt that to be true. But it is strange when you consider how many "tasks" type apps are for sale for both the iPhone and Android. Somebody must want to keep track of tasks, when these apps are so prevalent, right?
Many of those aforementioned Tasks apps are far superior to what WM had though. I use OmniFocus, which is about 1000x more powerful.

I sort of have to agree with Jason: I think you guys are being too harsh on WP7. For better or worse, the WM power users aren't the primary target market for the product. Apple has, for years, made tremendous success by making products that are "less is more", especially given their clean and functional UIs. I recently held and played with a WP7 device and was quite impressed. My biggest problem from switching, at the moment, is the apps I use, both commercial and in-house; otherwise I'd seriously consider it.

Finally, to be honest, I think Android will capture the power-user market for the foreseeable future. Most of my coworkers are using Android devices. Meanwhile, I putter along with the iPhone, happy in the clean UI and stable product.

--janak
 
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  #16  
Old 01-07-2011, 03:50 PM
Phillip Dyson
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Janak Parekh View Post
I sort of have to agree with Jason: I think you guys are being too harsh on WP7.
I agree with Jason too. If the timeline was truly 12 months then I think WP7 is an admirable achievement. Of course admirable doesn't necessarily translate to marketshare.

As a software developer myself, actually a team lead, I can appreciate the scope of builting something from the ground up in that timeline and I'm sure MS' scale dwarfs mine solely on the nature of their business model.

I was a bit disappointed in the article though. I was expecting, or hoping for a timeline type piece where I could follow them all the way to market. But otherwise it was okay.

I haven't jumped to WP7 yet, I'm still skipping along with my Nexus One. I'm still waiting to see what MS is going to do with the platform in the long run. And based on what I've heard so far (update rumors) I'm not too impressed with their momentum.

But we'll see. Times have changed in the software iteration world. Hopefully they will pick that up.
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  #17  
Old 01-07-2011, 04:14 PM
TheBigCheese
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Default Bad Math

Windows Phone 7 was started in December 2008 and delivered in December 2010. The author says designed, coded, and shipped in 12 months. Perhaps he is not the best qualified to write a tech story not being able to do simple arithmetic? Also, I'll bet much code was from the Zune so it really was not completely designed and coded starting 12/08.

Last edited by TheBigCheese; 01-07-2011 at 04:17 PM..
 
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  #18  
Old 01-07-2011, 04:24 PM
TheBigCheese
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sven View Post
I'm sure you wouldn't agree with the reasoning, even if you knew it. My guess is they did a survey and found fewer than (pick a small percentage) of users used tasks.
This is the same reasoning they gave for the feature set of the Kin. Their target market for the Kin (according to an MS spokesperson) was a teen to twenty something slacker who knew more bartenders than business people and was unemployed more than employed. The WP7 market was for late teen to 30's who had a career.

It appears that the target market for WP7 is the entertainment oriented subset whose digital life revolves around Facebook and Xbox. There are no features that would make it useful in a business environment or for a power user. These may come but for now, the device is pretty much an entertainment box.
 
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  #19  
Old 01-07-2011, 05:41 PM
jimtravis
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Default Microsoft should have CTRL ALT DEL'd their WM Marketing Dept.

Interesting article. Classic WM, like all platforms, needed some code tuning, and user friendliness added, but maybe (one of) the main reason they got their butt kicked by the iPhone, and Droid was both those devices were extensively advertised in the mainstream media vs. zero to little advertising for the platform whose butt was kicked. It was hard to go a night of network TV without seeing several iPhone / Droid ads. Add in the multiple lighted kiosks ads for iPhone downtown, the movie commercials for Droid at the cinema, and all the free mentions Apple gets in the mainstream press when a new product is introduced, and you have a marketing juggernaut. At the same time, the non-tech consumer saw - lets see - zero mainstream ads for Windows Mobile. After seeing multiple ads about the iPhone / Droid doing some nice things in the commercials, shock of all shocks, the non-tech consumer who never saw a WM ad, bought the iPhone, or Droid when they decided to upgrade from their dumb phone, or feature phone. Harvard MBA's please take note that several heavily mainstream advertised products massively outsold a competing product with little to no mainstream advertising. What a new phenomenon, first time that has happened. Apple followed the same heavy mainstream advertising strategy with the iPod, and now with the iPad. Meanwhile, the competition did no to little mainstream advertising while getting their butt kicked by the product being heavily advertised.

Owned about a dozen Classic WM devices over a 10 year period. All of them were very reliable, stable, and since I favored the larger screen devices, 95% of the time I used finger navigation. Don't doubt the horror stories I have seen on the web about WM, but for me, Classic WM is still the most stable of the mobile OS's I use, and still out of the box does more of the things I use than competing platforms. Fortunately, you can find apps for Android to add in many of the features, but not for iOS due to Apple's restrictions. I reset my iPhone 4, various gen touches, Android, and even WP 7 more often than any Classic WM device I own. In the interest of full disclosure, I usually purchased the top of the line WM device not the inexpensive devices with inadequate processor, and memory. In the two months I have owned the HD7, I have needed to take out the battery twice to reset a frozen device. In 10 years with a dozen Classic WM devices, I had to remove the battery about the same number of times. Twice with one WP7 in two months vs twice in 10 years with a dozen Classic WM devices.

Although I tried various shells with WM, I usually ended up with the Today screen customized to my liking with Pocket Plus. Microsoft should have constantly tuned the code, and added the slick UI / user friendliness the new smartphone users demand while keeping the customizability / feature richness vs. throwing out the old, and starting from scratch. Their marketing dept for Classic WM (if they had one) should have been CTRL ALT DEL'd, not the product.

In addition to the purchased HD7, I just won a LQ Quantum. The Metro UI is nice, but frankly I don't see it being the massive improvement in mobile UI that Microsoft was aiming at. It's slick, and smooth, but so are the competition. Again, in the interest of full disclosure, I am not a big gamer, or social network user, two of the target audiences for WP7. In its current rendition, WP7 is missing too many features I use to be my daily driver. Even if they added in the features, and the essential 3rd party apps were developed, I don't see any compelling killer app or feature that would cause me to go back to Microsoft from my newly adopted Android platform after Microsoft CTRL ALT Del'd their loyal Classic WM users for the new slick, smooth, but feature limited WP7.

Last edited by jimtravis; 01-07-2011 at 06:22 PM..
 
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  #20  
Old 01-07-2011, 06:17 PM
Sven Johannsen
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TheBigCheese View Post
There are no features that would make it useful in a business environment or for a power user. These may come but for now, the device is pretty much an entertainment box.
Not sure that is entirely true, IF, you have an Exchange/Sharepoint environment. Seems to actually cover that scenario pretty well. I don't get the lack of tasks support, but that has always been a little spotty. IIRC that wasn't an original EAS capability even on Windows Mobile. (I could be misremebering this). Notes has always been a sort of love/hate IMHO. A flat file of yellow stickies got unmanageable very quickly. OneNote is really a much better option form this sort of free-form bits of info catalog. My guess at a 'survey' was somewhat tongue-in-cheek, but based on many the rational for many such bizarre direction decisions over the years. The followup question always becomes, "who the heck did you survey?" Sometimes you wonder if the answer isn't, 'a group that gave us the result we wanted'
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