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View Full Version : David Caulton Responds to Robert Scoble's Post


Jason Dunn
11-02-2006, 01:00 AM
<div class='os_post_top_link'><a href='http://www.zunester.com/2006/10/scobles-post.html' target='_blank'>http://www.zunester.com/2006/10/scobles-post.html</a><br /><br /></div><em>&quot;A lot of the points make me say &quot;yeah, but wait a bit.&quot; It's not that we don't get Podcasting (Robert knows I'm among the loudest voices about Podcasting at Microsoft), it's that podcasting wasn't done in time. I don't expect anyone to buy based on my promises, but it's important to separate things we don't have at launch from comments about Zune's long term prospects.&quot;</em><br /><br />Remember that <a href="http://www.zunethoughts.com/news/show/151/robert-scoble-interviews-matt-jubelirer.html" target="_blank">Robert Scoble interview with Matt Jubelirer</a> recently? David Caulton sure does, and he put together a few responses last week to the issues that Robert later raised in <a href="http://scobleizer.wordpress.com/2006/10/26/my-thoughts-about-zune-vs-ipod/" target="_blank">a separate post</a>. Most of it is pretty standard rebuttal/agreement stuff: the Zune team is focused on mainstream use scenarios like music, not podcasting, there's nothing special about white headphones any more, and the round dpad is different from what iPod users are used to but ultimately very easy to adapt to and not a hurdle like some thing it is.<br /><br />What really caught my attention though was in reading the comments: there's the usual flaming that goes on (pity, that) but <a href="http://www.zunester.com/2006/10/scobles-post.html#c116226763950351352" target="_blank">David's response</a> was worth noting:<br /><br /><em>&quot;Man, how long do you guys think we've been doing this? I was in the room in January when we started whiteboarding. Yes, THIS January. We'll ship podcasting, and we'll call it &quot;Podcasting&quot; when we do.&quot;</em><br /><br />This confirms what I've thought all along (and maybe this is common knowledge, but it's news to me): the Zune team is extremely new, this first generation Zune is light on features, and looking a whole lot like the Gigabeat S, because they didn't have time to do anything else. That might not be a great way to launch a foray into a brand new market, but it's better to try, fail, and learn what to do next time when to never launch at all. It gives me hope that wireless Zune to PC sync is missing because they didn't have time to implement it rather than not thinking of it all to begin with.

Macguy59
11-02-2006, 01:33 AM
, but it's better to try, fail, and learn what to do next time when to never launch at all. .

Not sure I agree with that. I guess you think consumers have a short memory. If first gen turns them off how likely are they to give 2nd gen a try? Podcasting isn't mainstream? Someone is not paying attention.

Jason Dunn
11-02-2006, 05:26 AM
Not sure I agree with that. I guess you think consumers have a short memory. If first gen turns them off how likely are they to give 2nd gen a try?

But do you really think someone buying a Zune is going to feel "burned"? We geeks might be ticked off that it won't do WiFi PC synching, but if Average Joe doesn't know how cool that WOULD have been, is he really going to feel "burned"? No, he buys it for what it is and does, not what it COULD be.

Podcasting isn't mainstream? Someone is not paying attention.

Mainstream is a tricky word - in the strictest sense of the word, mainstream would mean a significant portion of the population is using a given technology. Email, mobile phones, and Web browsing are truly mainstream. Podcasting? Absolutely no way. Is podcasting "mainstream" about the techno elite, the people who use RSS, are on the Web all day, know how to rip a DVD? Sure, absolutely. I understand that the integration of podcasting into iTunes has lowered the bar and made it much easier for people to use, but I absolutely guarantee that if I asked ten random people I know if they downloaded podcasts they would look at me with confusion. It's just not mainstream. Neither is RSS. Both are still largely geeky things.