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View Full Version : Motorola Smartphone Pulls an "iPAQ"?


Andy Sjostrom
08-04-2003, 08:36 AM
<div class='os_post_top_link'><a href='https://gullfoss2.fcc.gov/cgi-bin/ws.exe/prod/oet/forms/reports/Search_Form.hts?mode=Edit&form=Exhibits&application_id=641395&fcc_id=QDJ-0303BEN01' target='_blank'>https://gullfoss2.fcc.gov/cgi-bin/ws.exe/prod/oet/forms/reports/Search_Form.hts?mode=Edit&form=Exhibits&application_id=641395&fcc_id=QDJ-0303BEN01</a><br /><br /></div>Federal Communications Commission (FCC) recently published photos, test report details, and a 123 page user manual of Motorola's Smartphone. I believe that Motorola's phone has the potential being the "iPAQ" of Smartphones, or at least make Motorola the "Compaq" of the smart phone market. If it is well marketed, accepted by carriers and prioritized by retail stores, I believe that this phone can pave the way for the success of this platform.<br /><br />In my opinion, we're looking at Motorola's field test of the market and if the phone perfoms well, I believe that we'll see much more energy and resources coming from Motorola in the future. Operating system upgrade, integrated Bluetooth and WiFi and more hardware innovation is what is on Motorola's Smartphone roadmap. I believe.

encece
08-04-2003, 05:11 PM
I dont understand why the author says that the Motorola will be the next iPaq?

I know how iPaqs were one of the first to lead the charge (at least effectively), making the PPC standard what it is today.

HTC & Orange have done a teriffic job getting this out to the public but HTC is "only" the manufacturer and Orange doesn't have a global reach...well, at least not in NA.

Motorola has the global reach...but can companies like this really lead the charge when their success is limited to Network acceptance and availability?

The phones are not sold like PCs or PPCs. And they should be. Until they are, they will only be as successful as the networks allow them to be.

I confused myself!

greenmozart
08-04-2003, 05:17 PM
If it is well marketed, accepted by carriers and prioritized by retail stores, I believe that this phone can pave the way for the success of this platform.

I'd agree with you, Andy, but the statement you make above is the 400 lb gorilla. We have not seen the carriers embrace this platform in North America yet. Since we are at the will of the carriers more so than other parts of the world in terms of what phones are released I'm concerned that Microsoft may have a harder time gaining market share here than around the globe, that is unless they get in bed with a couple carriers who actually get phones to market ($#@%$%@ Verizon!).

The second key to success is marketing to the general public. I think the best marketing opportunity for these phones is their e-mail sync capability. Blackberry has made an industry out of e-mail push technology. If you have an Exchange server, or use Outlook for e-mail, which many people do, you now have Blackberry-like performance for e-mail right on your phone! There's no need to buy a separate device and more server software. All that's missing is the thumboard (c'mon OEMs... let's see some practical and diverse hardware design here!!), but you at least have T9. Add to that the ability to sync all your contacts from one source, and have your calendar with you at all times - again, FROM ONE SOURCE - and we are finally starting to realize the promise of a centralized data repository where you have one database that is accessed from multiple devices and locations. I don't store many contacts in my current phone because it is a giant PIA to enter them all. Plus, I already have them in my PPC, sync'ed from Outlook. I am itching to have these same contacts sync'ed to my phone with no additional software so I can dial them easily without having to look them up in my PPC. Then I will truly consider myself operational on the road.

Sorry for the long post, but I am so anxious to snare one of these phones, whether it's from Motorola, Samsung or anyone else for that matter. Motorola has a lot of loyalists and a recognizable name in the industry here in the US, so perhaps they could be the lightning-rod that affects the MS SmartPhone momentum. I wouldn't limit the SmartPhone's success to Motorola's bandwagon, though. Samsung is making huge strides and many people (including me) prefer their hardware.

I believe the success of the MS SmartPhone here in the US is tied directly to carrier adoption and marketing, provided the phone works as advertised. :wink:

markpmc
08-04-2003, 05:18 PM
I'm not sure what Motorola is doing.

They have the Symbian based A920 coming out for "3" soon.
The Linux/Java based A760 is expected in Asia any day now.

Now a PPC clamshell. I admit that the feature set is "what I've been waiting for", but I just don't trust that Moto will stick with the device if sales are weaker than expected.

markpmc

Corn Bread
08-09-2003, 08:26 AM
Motorola has the global reach...but can companies like this really lead the charge when their success is limited to Network acceptance and availability?

In a word, yes. network acceptance and ties are 2 very important factors when it comes to Telecommunications. Although not as popular or accepted as Nokia and Samsung, the brand name "Motorola still carries substantial weight and leverage and with them adopting Smartphone 2K2 give the OS more credibility. I agree with Andy on this one, this could be similar to the iPAQ storm. :twisted:



The phones are sold like PCs or PPCs. And they should be. Until they are, they will only be as successful as the networks allow them to be.


If the Smartphone is continued to be sold like PCs and PPCs, I don't see it being successful, that business model just won't work on the telecommunications market.

encece
08-09-2003, 09:29 AM
I edited my post to say the the phones are NOT sold like PCs and PPCs. And they should be. That's what I meant to write.

I don't see it being successful, that business model just won't work on the telecommunications market.


It wouldn't be a successful business model for the telecommunications companies. But it would be for Microsoft, the hardware manufacturers, and retailers.

I'm pretty upset that there are over 100,000 smartphones floating around the world and none officially to be purchased here in the US.

Technology enthusiasts made the PPC and Palms what they are today. The masses then followed. And more devices were created and marketed to different user preferences.

Phones sold in this same manner, I believe, would be equally as successful. The beauty of the smartphone is not the phone part itself. It's the PDA part.

PocketPC-Phone Editions and their Palm counterparts are not hugely successful by any means. Too large and bulky and intimidating for the masses. Technology enthusiasts and power-users are the market there. The smartphone should focus on that same market with the addition of everyone else who will embrace it because of it familiar phone form and simpler OS.

If I want a phone, then I have many other devices to choose from other than the smartphone that will do the job alot better today.

If I want a PDA...then there are a slew of devices out there to cover that need. My preference being the PPC platform.

The smartphone is on the fence between the two devices and should be marketed as such. I am really doubtful it will be globally successful marketed thru the Networks alone. Europe & Japan work that way in some form dont they? I could easily go to an Orange shop to buy the phone subsidized or buy it outright elsewhere using it on any network I wish.

If it weren't for ebay and TMobile's GSM...I wouldn't have been have had the phone for the past 4 months nor be singing it's praises today.

Put the phone in a CompUSA...and there would be alot more here in NA being used, and the platform would be flourishing, probably already on it's next OS with more models to choose from.

I don't know why I feel like I'm the only one that makes sense to.

Just because phones have always been sold thru carriers doesn't mean it needs to continue to do so forever. Take the leash off of the NA consumers and we'll be able to compete with Japan & Europe in our mobile device consumption and usage.

Jerry Raia
02-23-2005, 09:41 AM
Hindsight being 20/20. I don't think we need to worry about Moto being the iPAQ of the Smartphones. iLeadBallon maybe. :lol: